Personal Reflection and Growth Through Communication

Have you ever analyzed your response after having a conversation? I do. I look for moments I could have said something more, spoken less, or changed the way I emotionally responded. I know it is an exhausting task, but it has helped me make some necessary changes when it comes to communication.

The company I work for implements a program that helps employees recognize personality traits that lead during their interactions with others. The training involves completing an evaluation that measures not only a person’s dominant method of expression but also characteristics heightened and decreased in the work environment. My results peg me as a supportive, and inclusive communicator, who shuts down when not given an opportunity to process new information. The portion of my profile that hit me the hardest stated that when I shut down, others perceive me as not caring or lacking in understanding. After reading that section I began going over past discussions with my superiors, where I have felt as if my intelligence is being questioned. Looking back considering this new information, I am coming to recognize my role in the way I have been feeling.

When we are bothered by an exchange of words, our knee jerk reaction is to blame the other party. Discovering personal traits that influence our behavior during that interaction can save us from frustration and develop a better understanding of others. Because the fact of the matter is we cannot change anyone but ourselves. This fact also takes away any power another person has over our responses.

DISC Personality Quiz

Below is a link to a free DISC personality quiz that gives you an overview of your dominant traits. This estimation will give you an idea of how you respond to others and provide a starting point to improving communication skills.

http://www.discoveryreport.com/DiscoveryReportForm_quick.php

Fellow Resolifers, have you reflected on a previous discussion and found yourself wishing you could make some changes?  Think about how you can still alter your responses in the future. Share your experiences and comments below.

 

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